An alligator upstream of the Peace River's terminus at Charlotte Harbor.

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“Our mission statement is we help the world grow the food it needs — it’s a fact that our people are proud of. For them, it means jobs, but jobs with purpose because they understand that at the end of the day, when you're breaking bread around the dinner table, odds are it started right here in central and southwest Florida with phosphate.”

Jackie Barron, spokesperson, the Mosaic Co.
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Formerly mined land in the process of rehabilitation. “The whole nature of the river has changed extraordinarily as a result of 100 years of strip mining … Part of the phosphate land is just going to get sacrificed. It’ll never be the same.”

Dennis Mader, executive director of People for Protecting Peace River
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A ‘stack’ of phosphogypsum, the radioactive waste from processing phosphate, in Bartow.

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Canoeists on the tannin-stained waters of the Peace River, which Native Seminoles call Tallackchopo.

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